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Bill went to Denver and San Francisco following KFWB where he had impressive success.

He then went to Honolulu’s KHVH, was later pd of KGMB and then returned to the mainland to KNBR-San Francisco.

In 1973 John joined KABC television as a writer/producer and eventually went into news management.

"When I was at Channel 7's news assignment desk I could get the reporters to do four stories a day.

Backus continued acting in character on Gilligan’s Island.

In 1949, he provided the voice of the nearsighted Mr.

Then it was 3, then 2 and now they think they're doing a favor by covering one story." John retired in 1995 and was active writing and running the Boys school.

His wife of 17 years was principal of the Dubonoff School for "kids at risk." Their daughter attended the Peabody Music Conservatory in Baltimore. Former KFWB newsman Al Wiman said unequivocally that John "was the best news person EVER!

He also was a sports columnist for the Los Angeles Herald Express.

One of his movie roles was playing James Dean's weak-willed, vacillating father in Rebel Without A Cause.

He is also remembered as the pitchman for a light bulb commercial imploring, "Don't be a bulb snatcher! His stage career began in summer stock, where, according to his then-roommate Keenan Wynn, he was as well known for his prowess with the ladies as he was for his on-stage versatility.

Magoo for the first time in the UPA cartoon Ragtime Bear; the actor later claimed that he based this character on his own businessman father.

Beginning in the summer of 1957 he broadcast interviews from the upper deck of the “Big White Steamer” that crossed the channel from San Pedro to Avalon. He was briefly the announcer of the California Angels but his strength was behind the scenes.

Life magazine carried a photo of Carl’s broadcast and he was made a “Commodore of the in 1925, he was a color commentator and producer of sports projects at KMPC for decades. Steve worked with such popular sportscasters as Bob Kelley and Dick Enberg, and produced game broadcasts of the Pacific Coast League L. He began his career in 1946, moving right out of college to go to work in his hometown of He died November 24, 1995, of complications following treatment for lymphoma. Sports announcer Dick Enberg reflected for Larry Stewart in the LA Times: "Steve was a producer before there were producers.

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