Dating didcot oxfordshire

A hoard of 126 gold Roman coins dating to around 160 CE was found just outside the village in 1995 by an enthusiast with a metal detector; this is now displayed at the Ashmolean Museum on loan from the British Museum.The name is believed to be derived from that of Dida, a 7th-century Mercian sub-king who ruled the area around Oxford and was the father of Saint Frithuswith or Frideswide, now the patron saint of both Oxford and Oxford University.Didcot village was on the route between London and Wantage (present day Wantage Road) and had three turnpikes (toll gates).These brought in revenue for local landowners and gentry and operated between 17 when they were abolished due to the growing use of the railway.

In World War II, there was so much military traffic to the port of Southampton that it was decided to upgrade the line: the northern section between Didcot and Newbury became fully double track; it closed for 5 months in 1942–43 for this to be done.The town is noted for its railway heritage, having been a station on Brunel's Great Western Main Line from London Paddington, opening in 1844.Today the town is known for its railway museum and power stations, and is the gateway town to the Science Vale: three large science and technology centres in the surrounding villages of Milton (Milton Park), Culham (Culham Science Centre) and Harwell (Harwell Science and Innovation Campus which includes the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory).) is a railway town and civil parish in the ceremonial county of Oxfordshire, England.Historically part of Berkshire, Didcot is 10 miles (16 km) south of Oxford, 8 miles (13 km) east of Wantage and 15 miles (24 km) north west of Reading.The Great Western Railway, engineered by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, reached Didcot in 1839.

You must have an account to comment. Please register or login here!